Tag Archives: potatoes

Samosa Potato Salad

"This is the best potato salad I have ever had."

Everyone who tries it

samosa potato salad

This is what happens when a favorite Indian street food and a favorite picnic dish collide in my thoughts at 3 a.m. The amount of cayenne can be varied to alter the spiciness, but the 1/4 teaspoon called for in the recipe adds just enough for most tastes, while keeping the other flavors balanced. Use a good quality curry powder.

 

Ingredients:
3 lbs. small yellow potatoes, diced into bite-sized pieces
2 tbsp olive oil
1 1/2 C yellow onion, diced (about 1 medium onion)
4 tbsp fresh ginger, minced
1 3/4 tbsp curry powder
2 tsp ground coriander
1 tbsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp ground cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp salt
1 tbsp lime juice
1 1/4 C mayonnaise (use Vegenaise to make it vegan)
3/4 C fresh cilantro, chopped
1 C green peas, cooked

Directions:
In a large pot, boil potatoes in lightly salted water just until tender. Drain and set aside.

Return pan to medium heat; add olive oil. Add onions, ginger, curry, coriander, cumin, cayenne, and salt. Saute until onions are tender and spices are fragrant. Remove from heat. Add lime juice, mayonnaise, and cilantro.

Combine peas, potatoes, and onion mixture in a large bowl. Stir to combine. Chill for an hour before serving.

Sauerkraut Kielbasa Soup

vegan sauerkraut kielbasa soup

Ingredients:
1 tbsp olive oil
1 cup chopped onion
2 cloves minced garlic
1/2 tsp paprika
2 carrots, thinly sliced
3 cups cubed potatoes (yukon gold or red)
1 package Tofurkey Kielbasa – sliced lengthwise, then into 1/2-inch pieces
16 oz sauerkraut, drained (I like Hengstenberg, it’s made with white wine)
10 cups water
3 tbsp + 1 tsp Better Than Bouillon No-Chicken broth concentrate
1/4 tsp ground marjoram
1 tsp parsley flakes
1/4 tsp fresh-ground black pepper, or more to taste

Directions:
In large pot or dutch oven over medium heat, saute onion until translucent, stirring occasionally. Add garlic and saute until fragrant. Add sliced kielbasa, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned.

Add remaining ingredients. Bring to boiling, cover, reduce heat and simmer 45-50 minutes (or longer), until carrots and potatoes are tender.

Makes about 12 servings.

Quinoa Taters

mushroom walnut loaf, quinoa mashed potatoes, sesame green beans, cornbread

The pinnacle of my dining-out experiences this week was the deliciously square meal pictured above: mushroom walnut loaf and quinoa mashed potatoes topped with delicious vegan gravy. It’s served beside sesame green beans and cornbread. This is one of the best meals I’ve ever had, at the Red Herring or otherwise.

These mashed potatoes… with red quinoa? Yes, please. The next time you think someone’s about to ask, “where do you get your protein?”, put a plate of these in front of them (with gravy, of course) and they’ll be too busy inhaling them to ask. (Quinoa is a protein-rich grain – 8 grams per cup, cooked. A medium red potato with skin on has 4 grams too.)

quinoa taters

Let’s have a close-up shot of those taters, shall we? The camera loves you, baby.

C-U Vegan Meetup, August Edition: Brunch

August’s Meetup for the C-U Vegan Meetup Group featured the most underrated meal of the day: brunch. Our small group gathered at Jason’s house to admire his staghorn fern (vegan taxidermy!), discuss how it gets watered, contemplate restroom fixtures and the people who love them, and enjoy some delicious vegan brunch dishes.

vegan chorizo scramble

Amber scrambled up a delicious combination of Soyrizo, tofu “eggs”, potatoes, peppers, and onions. I could eat this every day.

raspberries and cucumbers

Dana found a great sale on red raspberries and shared the bounty, along with some cucumbers from her CSA.

masala spiced donut bites

Dana also made Masala Spiced Donut Bites from Meet the Shannons. She did not disclose the calories per bite, which she actually dared to calculate. They’re baked, but rolled in melted Earth Balance and spiced sugar, resulting in deliciousness.

Amelia's coffee cake

Amelia baked a delicious coffee cake, filled with cinnamon streusel and walnuts. It contains yogurt, and was extra rich and tasty.

vegan diner herbed sausage patties

Amelia and Chase also brought delicious Herbed Breakfast Sausage Patties The recipe is from Vegan Diner, and the author, Julie Hasson, is a genius with seitan. I need to make these at home NOW since I found vegan English muffins last week. Veg McMuffin, anyone?

I missed getting photos for my own Biscuits and Sausage Gravy, but Dana managed to get great photos of some other yummy dishes, including baked french toast, tofu scramble, carrot and raisin muffins, tofu frittata, homemade tomato bagels topped with Parma!, roasted potatoes, and vegan egg rolls.

And on top of all this goodness, this weekend I found the scribbled-on-a-post-it recipe I made for Seitan Gyros! So now I just need to find some sumac and give it a little tweak, then unleash it upon the world. I’m contemplating shaping it into a big cone and steaming it that way for a little more authenticity.

 

A Batch of Breakfast Burritos, and Mexican Rice

breakfast burritos

I made ten breakfast burritos last weekend, which I froze or refrigerated for future grab-and-go breakfasts. Each burrito contains:

  • a flour tortilla
  • a smear of vegetarian refried beans
  • Mexican Rice (see recipe below)
  • basic scrambled tofu
  • breakfast potatoes
  • a little hot sauce (Cholula is good)
a batch of breakfast burritos in a bag
Why not use the tortilla bag to hold them together in the freezer?

The process took about an hour. All components except the refried beans were prepared from scratch. A lot of the time was not hands-on, such as when the rice was simmering. I could have used two separate skillets for potatoes and scrambled tofu and cooked them simultaneously, but I wanted to keep dirty pans to a minimum. I cooked the breakfast potatoes in the skillet, followed by the scrambled tofu.

The breakfast potatoes are simply diced potatoes sauteed in olive oil, seasoned with salt and pepper.

These burritos are very filling. I prefer to let them thaw a little in the refrigerator overnight (or longer) before microwaving. I heat them on medium power to avoid hot ends and a cold middle.

I tossed one in my bag this morning and it was an excellent post-run breakfast.

Mexican Rice

This recipe makes more than double what you need for ten breakfast burritos, but reheats well. Use any type of rice you prefer, including long-grain or basmati. I used a medium-grain rice because that’s what I had on hand.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups medium-grain rice
  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • 1 8-oz can tomato sauce (not spaghetti sauce)
  • 2 tsp vegetable stock concentrate (Better Than Bouillon is what I use, or substitute 2 cups of broth)
  • 2 tsp cumin
  • 2 tsp smoked paprika
  • 2 tsp onion powder
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper

Directions:
In a deep saucepan, heat canola oil over medium heat. Add rice and stir to coat. Toast rice for a few minutes while preparing liquid mixture, stirring occasionally.

Meanwhile, in a 4-cup measuring container, combine tomato sauce, spices, and vegetable stock concentrate or broth. Add enough water to make a total of 4 cups of liquid.

Stir liquid into rice. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer 20 minutes. (Be sure to follow cooking time guidelines for the rice you’re using.)

Uncover rice and remove from heat. Stir to separate grains and let stand for about 10 minutes before serving.

Tip: When reheating rice, it helps to sprinkle a little water on it before microwaving, in a covered dish. It keeps the rice moist.

Mashing Words: Restrictive USDA School Lunch, WIC Guidelines for White Potatoes

Here come the tater-haters.

Last year, USDA guidelines banned white potatoes from purchase with Women, Infants and Children (WIC) supplemental nutrition program benefits. Now additional guidelines seek to totally eliminate white potatoes from school breakfast programs, and severely limit servings of white potatoes and other “starchy vegetables” in school lunch programs.

From the proposed USDA guidelines: “A maximum of 1 cup of starchy vegetables may be served per week. Starchy vegetables include white potatoes, corn, green peas, and lima beans.”

“A basic premise of the 2005 Dietary Guidelines is that nutrient needs should be met primarily by consuming a variety of nutrient-dense foods from the basic food groups.” (Reference: http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/governance/regulations/2011-01-13.pdf, pg. 2495, section III. )

The guidelines were developed under the premise that by removing servings of potatoes and so-called “starchy vegetables”, schools could serve more green vegetables and other “nutrient-dense foods”. But the reality is that, while we’re spending time banning and limiting whole, natural foods, we are still feeding kids plenty of processed, food-like substances like chicken nuggets, hot dogs, Pop-Tarts, and margarine. Do we really expect a side-dish crackdown directed at a natural food to make a dent in this epidemic?

Smiles potato things, or something
Just look at that greasy grin.

If the USDA wants variety, shouldn’t the potato have a place? Potatoes are rich in nutrients like vitamin C. In fact, one potato contains more vitamin C than an entire head of iceberg lettuce. Shouldn’t we look at how often potatoes are served — and the ways in which they’re adulterated before they reach our plates? (See shaped and formed potato-like substance, right.) There are certainly other starchy carbohydrate sources such as sweet potatoes, quinoa, and wild or brown rice that supply energy, fiber, and nutrients, and are more nutritionally-rounded than the white potato. But do schools serve them? Can they afford them?

Perhaps is would be more productive for the USDA to classify the white potato as a starch, and specify that it be served alternately (not in addition to) other starches such as rice or bread. This would accomplish what they say is their goal: to make more room on our children’s plates for a variety of colorful vegetables and fruits. This is the right direction.

This singular starch ban fails to address a basic premise behind the problem of obesity: if you’re not looking at the diet as a whole, you’re missing the big picture. Japanese people, for example, consume large quantities of starchy white rice. Yet their rates of obesity are 3.2% versus the U.S. rate of 30.6% – we’re number one, and Japan is number 28. (Source: NationMaster.com.)

So let’s give the potato its place. I’ve prepared (and packed in lunches) many healthy, filling meals with a baked potato as a base – topping them with chili, salsa and black beans, broccoli, or fajita vegetables. I don’t eat them every day, and I don’t choose the most enormous potatoes in the store. I moderate my own variety, and I’m sure our schools can do the same.

 

Samosas with Cilantro Chutney

samosas with cilantro chutney

These Vegetable Samosas from VegWeb.com were the first item to be devoured at Potluck #1 (of 3) this weekend. I made a large batch of filling, with curry powder instead of Korma sauce, so I might have to make some more dough.

The cilantro chutney (sometimes labeled coriander chutney if you’re looking for a pre-made version), is a quick recipe I created. Like many of the things I come up with, it’s a combination of 2 or 3 recipes I’ve seen on the web, adapted to whatever I have on hand, and rarely measured accurately since I always adjust things to our tastes.

Cilantro Chutney

Ingredients:
1/4 large white onion, roughly chopped
1 jalapeño pepper, roughly chopped, including seeds and ribs
1 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp mustard seed
juice of 1/2 lime
1 large bunch cilantro, ends of stems removed
1 tbsp olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
In a food processor, combine onion, jalapeño, cumin, mustard seed, and lime juice. Pulse until chopped finely. Be careful not to breathe the aerated jalapeño juice!

Wash and dry cilantro, then chop into about 4 sections, breaking up stems so it will fit into your food processor. Don’t be afraid the use the stems… they have a lot of flavor. Add to food processor, and process until smooth. Drizzle in olive oil until well blended. Add salt and pepper to taste.

“Steakhouse” Potato Salad

Vegan "Steakhouse" Potato Salad

This is a clone of a supermarket potato salad. I’ve also seen it on salad bars at actual steakhouses. I never tasted the real thing, so I don’t know how this one compares to the original. The family says it’s close.

Ingredients:
2 lbs petite red potatoes, cut into 1/2″ dice
1 1/2 cup Vegenaise
2 tbsp non-dairy milk (or more if you like a thinner dressing)
2 tsp dijon mustard
3/4 tsp garlic powder
3/4 tsp onion powder
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1/4 tsp salt (or to taste)
1 tbsp parsley, chopped
2 tbsp green onions – green tops only, chopped
1/2 cup Daiya Cheddar Style shreds
1/4 cup imitation bacon bits

Directions:
Cook potatoes in boiling water until just tender. (Do not overcook, or you will end up with mashed potatoes! Not that there is anything wrong with that.) Drain potatoes and set aside in a large bowl to cool.

Meanwhile, mix the dressing in a small bowl. Combine Vegenaise, milk, mustard, garlic, onion, pepper, parsley, and green onions. Fold in Daiya and bacon bits.

Pour dressing over potatoes while they are still lukewarm. Fold gently until combined. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

African Peanut Stew

Based on an African Peanut Soup recipe from Emeril Lagasse. The original recipe called for sweet potatoes. I would prefer the sweet-spicy contrast, but my family likes white potatoes better.

African Peanut Stew

Ingredients:African Peanut Stew

  • 2 tablespoons peanut oil
  • 2 tablespoon curry powder (more if you like it spicy)
  • 2 medium onions, sliced (about 4 cups)
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 medium potatoes (about 2 pounds), peeled and cut into chunks
  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne
  • 1/2 cup creamy natural peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup chopped peanuts
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • fresh cilantro, chopped (for garnish – optional)

Directions:

Heat 2 tablespoons of peanut oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add curry powder and cook briefly for 1 minute. Add onions and cook until translucent (about 5 minutes). Add garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Stir in potatoes, stock, and tomatoes, and bring soup to a boil. Simmer, covered, 20 to 30 minutes or until potatoes are tender.

Add salt, pepper, cayenne, peanut butter, peanuts, and coconut milk to the soup. Stir to combine. Bring mixture to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes.

Garnish bowls with cilantro, if desired.