Tag Archives: onions

Turnips, Take One

roasted turnips with caramelized onions

I tried turnips this week. I like them.

They were tossed with a little bit of olive oil, about 1/2 tsp of agave nectar, salt, and pepper, then roasted in a 400 degree oven. While the turnips cooked in the oven, I made some caramelized onions on the stove, then I threw them both together at the end.

The verdict: I like. I am starting to think my radio nickname really should be Root-Vegetable Rachel. But we would have to switch it to Rhubarb Rachel in the spring.

 

Peace, Love, and Caramelized Onions: Vegan MoFo #19

Caramelized Onion and Delicata Squash Pizza

Vegan MoFo 2011 - Vegan Month of FoodSaturday lunches are often a chance to make something more elaborate and/or experimental. Today I sampled a new vegetable: delicata squash. I sliced it in pieces, unpeeled, and roasted it in a 425 degree F oven with a bit of olive oil, salt, and pepper. The skin is so thin, it’s edible. Easy!

The squash was a great addition to this pizza, along with caramelized onions and sliced mushrooms. The crust is made from King Arthur White Whole Wheat Flour, my favorite whole-grain flour, and seasoned with a little garlic powder, fennel, and black pepper.

According to Wikipedia, “Delicata squash (Cucurbita pepo) is a winter squash with distinctive longitudinal dark green stripes on a yellow or cream colored background and sweet, orange-yellow flesh. It is also known as the peanut squash, Bohemian squash, or sweet potato squash (because of the flavor similarity to the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas)). Although considered a winter squash, delicata squash belongs to the same species as all types of summer squash (including pattypan squashzucchini and yellow crookneck squash).”

And the seeds are edible too, when toasted. I’ll have to save them next time!

Liebster Blog

It’s been a great week, full of good food and lots of love – from the people around me, as well as the blogging world. I’ve received three Liebster Blog Awards from bloggers throughout the week: Mel from Veganise This!, Bethany from Bananas for Smoothies, and Katie from Not Your Parents’ Granola. I’m so honored! Thank you!

‘Liebster’ is German for ‘dearest’ or ‘beloved’ but it can also mean ‘favorite.’ The idea behind this award is to bring attention to bloggers who have less than 200 followers and show your support during Vegan MoFo! Thank you for visiting I Eat Grains, and supporting both the blog and veganism.

To return the love, I get to name 5 of my favorite blogs for each of these awards. I’ll divide these 15 blogs into the next three posts. Here are the first 5:

JL Goes Vegan – I love her KALE t-shirt. Where can I get one?!

Not a Crazy Vegan – she’s from Chicago, shares my first name and last initial, and is not afraid to post failed dishes on the blog.

Seitan Beats Your Meat – I like Kelly’s blog, of course, but the picture on her About page has so much awesome: funky hair, retro clothing, and cupcakes. (Plus, there’s a bunny.) I’ve been a part-time non-vegan cake decorator too!

Sneaky Vegan has a great selection of recipes and is another vegan in an omnivorous family.

The Vegan Zombie has fun with zombies and vegan food all at the same time.

 

 

 

 

“There’s Something About Your Chili”

vegan chili with fried plantainsWe made chili last weekend in two pots: one vegan, and one with beef. Dave tasted both and ate the omni version, but he commented that there was something about the vegan chili that was really good – better than the beef. Neither one of us could pinpoint exactly what it was. I’m going to make a big crock pot of this and take it to work.

The ground coffee and chocolate provide very subtle flavors. You will not taste this chili and say, “ooh, coffee!” but you will taste a certain something something.

This was really yummy with a few fried plantains on the side.

damn good vegan chili

Damn Good Vegan Chili

Ingredients:
3/4 cup vegetable broth
1/4 tsp liquid smoke
1 cup TVP granules
1 tbsp olive oil
1 medium white onion, chopped *
2 tbsp chili powder (good quality stuff, like Penzeys)
1 tbsp ground cumin
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tbsp ground coffee (use a good quality, dark roast, preferably fresh-ground – NOT Folgers!)
1/2 tsp cocoa powder
1/4 tsp salt
a few dashes cayenne
1 15 oz can black beans, undrained
1 14.5 oz can Muir Glen Fire Roasted Diced Tomatoes
1 15 oz can peeled crushed tomatoes
1/2 tbsp jalapeño vinegar – the juice from the jar of pepper rings
1 tsp agave nectar

Directions:
In a bowl or 2-cup glass measuring cup, bring broth to a boil. Add liquid smoke and mix well. Add TVP granules and stir until moistened. Cover with plastic wrap or a folded towel and let stand to absorb liquid.

Meanwhile, in a heavy saucepan, saute onion in olive oil until translucent. Add chili powder, cumin, garlic, coffee, cocoa, salt, cayenne, and TVP mixture. Cook and stir until spices are fragrant, about two minutes.

Add black beans, along with their juice from the can, and both cans of tomatoes. Stir in jalapeño vinegar and agave nectar.

Simmer slowly about 15 minutes. The chili reheats well, and the flavors are even better the next day. It can also be frozen.

Makes 4-6 generous servings.

* What exactly is a medium onion, since “medium” is a relative measurement? Well, the standard medium onion is 1/5 of a pound, and equals about 1/2 cup when chopped. A large onion will yield about 1 cup, and a small onion will yield about 1/3 cup.

P.S. – The non-vegan chili was labeled truthfully to avoid confusion.

chili label

Fresh Gazpacho

This nutrient-rich cold soup is easy to make in a blender and keeps well in the refrigerator.

fresh gazpacho

Ingredients:
5 roma tomatoes, cored and cut in half
1 cucumber, halved and seeded, unpeeled
3 yellow, orange, or red bell peppers, seeded
1 small yellow onion
1 tbsp tomato paste (I used a concentrated version from a tube)
3 garlic cloves, pressed
1/4 cup parsely, finely chopped
1/4 cup seasoned rice wine vinegar
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 tbsp kosher salt (or to taste)
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Directions:
Grab a blender and a bowl large enough to hold your finished gazpacho. It’s a good idea to choose one with a lid, so you can refrigerate the soup later.

Roughly chop the onion, cucumbers, and bell peppers into 1-inch cubes. First blend the cucumber and onion, pulsing until finely chopped but not completely pureed. You want a few chunks to be left. Pour the cucumber and onion mixture into the bowl. Next, blend the peppers to the same consistency, and add them to the bowl. Lastly, place the tomatoes and tomato paste in the blender, and pulse until small chunks remain. Add to bowl.

Stir in pressed garlic, parsley, vinegar, oil, salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes to let the flavors develop. Serve ice-cold.

Cilantro Pesto and Caramelized Onion Pizza

It’s 52 degrees tonight! But it’s headed up to 90 this weekend, so it’s time to heat up the oven and make pizza while we can.

cilantro pesto caramelized onion pizza

The sauce is a Cilantro Pesto. It’s not just good on pizza, it’s great on black bean quesadillas, taco salads, sandwiches, and as a dip for jicama. All measurements are approximate, as long as you stick to the basic cilantro-cumin-onion-lime plan.

Basic Cilantro Pesto

1/4 of a white onion, cut into large chunks
1 clove garlic
1 bunch cilantro, stems and leaves (trim ends of stems)
1/2 tsp sea salt
1 tsp lime juice
1 tsp cumin
3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
ground black pepper to taste

Directions:
Combine white onion, garlic, cilantro, salt, lime juice, cumin and pepper in a food processor until smooth. Drizzle in olive oil.

The Crust
My favorite pizza crust recipe
is from Fogazzo, a wood-fired over manufacturer. I don’t refrigerate my dough as the recipe indicates, I just leave it in a warm place for about 40 minutes, punch it down, then divide into 4 balls, and let rise for about an hour more. You can use King Arthur White Whole Wheat flour to add some fiber, and throw in garlic powder or other spices. This time I went with coarse black pepper and oregano. The above recipe makes four 12-inch thin crust pizzas. I bake them on a stone at 450 degrees.

The Onions
So simple: just slice a white onion (Vidalia would work too) into strips and sauté in a bit of Earth Balance until nicely caramelized. I like to slice my strips from the top of the onion to the bottom, rather than cutting the onion into rings. I think the onions turn out less “stringy” after they’re cooked. Salt and pepper to taste.

I also sprinkled about 2 tsp of nutritional yeast on top for a little cheesy flavor.

So long, final days of spring.